Lethbridge gallery

I became a finalist at the small scale art award of the Lethbridge gallery in Brisbane. An art contest for small paintings. I was not able to be present at the announcement of the prizes, but it’s still fun to discover on Instagram the gallery owner picked just MY paintings to feature in advance!

Early works

When packing our stuff to move from New Zealand to Australia, I found some of my early paintings. As an artist I was a late starter (at the age of 26 or 27), so my first paintings are about 25 years old now.

A couple of years ago I painted a few portraits in a slightly off-realistic style and I certainly will go on with that project as soon as my time-seeds are germinated. But seeing my 25 years old paintings again, I realized my preference for ‘weird faces’ was already visible in my early days.
In 1993 I collected pictures from newspapers of people who were in some way ‘in action’. After I had a bunch of good mugs, I played around with the copying-machine to resized the pictures to my liking. Then I stuck them together in a way as if they are looking towards you.
A bit more experienced now, I would say the perspective, details and lighting is ‘somewhat challenging’, but this are still the kind of faces I would have chosen these days too.

havencafe, early havencafe detail 1 havencafe detail 2 References

I regret I only tore out the pictures and was not interested in the text in the newspapers. The only caption I remember was the guy in the green shirt. He was a golf player and was watching the trajectory of his ball towards the hole. On the painting you still can imagine he was carrying a golf stick in his left hand.

Some of my art treasures

Bakers don’t need to buy bread. Wood choppers are never in need of firewood. I hardly can imagine a general practitioner consults a general practitioner. And your drug dealer, well … you got it.
Some artists may think other artists are no target audience for their attempts to sell their art, but I certainly do buy art from other artists.

aardbeien, art treasures, strawberries, volcanoFor example; This was the first artwork I bought in a gallery 25 years ago. Actually I got it from my friend. It measures 8 x 8 centimeters and is signed with Kaja ’90. We thought it was an artist from Eastern Europe.
In the same gallery, I saw another painting that hit me right in the feels. A weird anciently scene, a gloomy sky, and in the middle a totally out of placed guy with a shocked face, sitting in a folding chair. Around him, a circle of used tissues?
Those days, in my mid twenties, that painting was way too expensive for me, so I let it be. I had forgotten to print in his name in my memory, but it would turn out I didn’t forget the scene.

Later on, I started my own art gallery in the Netherlands. Beside exhibiting my own work, I also showed the art of fellow artists. One day I had invited an artist to come over to the gallery to show his work and I was thumbing through his portfolio. On the very last page I saw … a painting with a lonely guy sitting in a folding chair in a dark and desolate landscape!

ophof800It was still available! I was delighted.
The artist was Alfred Ophof. I organized an exhibition for him and he took care that the price of the painting was now within my range, which I’m still thankful for.

A few exhibitions later I ended up with 3 paintings made by Johan de Wijs.
Here you see 2 of them.

de_idioot de_kinderwagen

elephant2One of the most interesting bronzes was this elephant of Anouk de Groot. On the second view (in case you missed it on the first glance) it can be quite a ‘conversation piece’.

But not every artwork has to come from a fancy gallery … Today in the op-shop I paid a few dollars for a precious little artwork. Even the tiny sign (B. Burns ’82) was meticulously neatly done. For me it’s clear this is/was a truly talented person.


stenen-poes

I’m sure this post will get a part 2 in the future, because there are still some artists on my wish list for a long time.


What about originality?

28 November 2016

Some people say: “Everything has been done already before”.
And I’ve always been afraid that the things I paint are created by someone else once before. That I am not aware of it and therefore I innocently could be accused of copy-catting. A demoralising thought!
Before the start of a new painting I thoroughly search the internet for images that could be interpreted as similar to my idea. If I find one, then the inspiration is instantly quenched.
Luckily it only happened once. I wanted to paint a Dutch mill on a moonscape, but a friend found an image of a comparable scene! I was disappointed and relieved at the same time.

There are artists who are inspired by the work of another artist. I think most of the artist are. At least at the beginning of their career. A lot has been written about the concept of inspiration, but personally I don’t want to see who is the source of inspiration in one’s artwork. If that is too transparent, I think the artist hasn’t fully developed his or her own handwriting. I won’t say then he is not a good artist, but for my own work I find it a requirement that nobody can see the early puppy admiration.
Actually, I’m not flattered anymore if someone says: “Ohh, your work reminds me of Dali!” Grmppff … what Dali?!?! My work is completely different! And it isn’t Willink-like too. Phew, get some new glasses!

I really want to stop checking the web before I hit a new canvas. Both beforehand and afterwards.
When I started my series of portraits in 2011 and just had finished 3 of them, I discovered a Serbian painter who created the same kind ‘deformed’ portraits and also had added a kind of fantasy stories to them.
I was upset for months! I so had enjoyed painting my own portraits and making up their imaginary lives … and now suddenly I could not go on with this project. The spark was completely dead.
It took months before I found back the fun. Months before I could see that the difference between the Serbian guy and me was big enough to go on. That there was room for both of us.

The image on the top left I found on the internet and is made by Justin Miller. On the right side my Agaricia Bullio.
The second left image was named ‘Gonzo Green forest’, but I couldn’t find any more information.
Justin, Gonzo, Slavko and I possibly have been the soil for the seeds of the same source of inspiration.
It doesn’t matter … everything has been done already before. It was a stupid fear anyway.

inspiration, originality

Art is a case of passing on

14 July 2015

Some artists state that their artworks are their children. And they find it hard to sell them. I think I understand what they try to say. In some way an artwork shows features about the artist which can’t be defended or protected any more, as soon as the work is released to the wide world. Just like a child.

I have no children, so maybe that gave me a slightly different perspective on art. For me art is the trick to put a seed in someone else’s head. But just like you do for a child; you only can hope that something good is growing out of it. I my case; from that seed in the viewer’s mind. Something like an idea, a new view, a realisation, an awareness or merging all those notions in one short intention, namely; a new inspiration.

And for me that is the best explanation of that difficult concept ‘Art’. Art is maybe just the transmission of inspiration. Not necessary from a painting to a new painting. But from a painting to an idea. From a painting to a new view. From a painting to a realisation or to an awareness …

An inspiration can be everything. I got my seeds from anywhere too.

passingon, Art is a case of passing on

The simmering pot

10 July 2015

Does a special word exist  for the fact that sometimes, on different places in the world the same ideas pop up, at the same time?

A few days ago I saw a picture on Facebook of a building made out of living trees. The branches were led and trimmed into the shape of a life-sized church. The structure was complete open and the inside of the building was usable as a sheltered area.
Barry Cox, the owner of this project grew it in only 4 years! So, that must have been in 2011. He plans to use his green church for weddings and I find it a great idea!
Then I discovered the guy lives in New Zealand! Just like me. I will definitely visit his garden when it opens in spring.

I couldn’t help to see a kind of similarity with my painting ‘The same one’. I painted it 2 years ago and who is willing to believe me it was in my sketchbook for years?
It doesn’t matter, because I love the imagination of an enormous simmering pot of inspiration, somewhere in the world. And when our globe is spinning and turning around, some splashes fling down on different people. Different people like an architect, an artist, an arborist or an entrepeneur who starting to play with them.
Maybe our ideas came from the same source. Or are made out of the same ingredients.

sameonechurch1

Oil on canvas, Patricia Van Lubeck, the simmering pot

Exhibition in Auckland

6 July 2015

It’s always interesting how other people describe my work 🙂

Crystel Chen of gallery iShen said:

“Patricia’s latest series ‘Unveiled’ pinpoints familiar human characteristics and paints them as refreshingly positive statements of individualism.
Her series of landscapes are though-provoking metaphors personifying the endless roles we all inhabit throughout life. Trees are painted as symbols to represent particular characteristics.
Patricia encourages the viewer to compose their own meanings from her paintings, but believes that the universality of these subjects will prompt people to identify fragments of their own selves in her work.”

20150711_234929[1]

Exhibition Auckland