Archive | July 2015

Art is a case of passing on

14 July 2015

Some artists state that their artworks are their children. And they find it hard to sell them. I think I understand what they try to say. In some way an artwork shows features about the artist which can’t be defended or protected any more, as soon as the work is released to the wide world. Just like a child.

I have no children, so maybe that gave me a slightly different perspective on art. For me art is the trick to put a seed in someone else’s head. But just like you do for a child; you only can hope that something good is growing out of it. I my case; from that seed in the viewer’s mind. Something like an idea, a new view, a realisation, an awareness or merging all those notions in one short intention, namely; a new inspiration.

And for me that is the best explanation of that difficult concept ‘Art’. Art is maybe just the transmission of inspiration. Not necessary from a painting to a new painting. But from a painting to an idea. From a painting to a new view. From a painting to a realisation or to an awareness …

An inspiration can be everything. I got my seeds from anywhere too.

passingon, Art is a case of passing on

The simmering pot

10 July 2015

Does a special word exist  for the fact that sometimes, on different places in the world the same ideas pop up, at the same time?

A few days ago I saw a picture on Facebook of a building made out of living trees. The branches were led and trimmed into the shape of a life-sized church. The structure was complete open and the inside of the building was usable as a sheltered area.
Barry Cox, the owner of this project grew it in only 4 years! So, that must have been in 2011. He plans to use his green church for weddings and I find it a great idea!
Then I discovered the guy lives in New Zealand! Just like me. I will definitely visit his garden when it opens in spring.

I couldn’t help to see a kind of similarity with my painting ‘The same one’. I painted it 2 years ago and who is willing to believe me it was in my sketchbook for years?
It doesn’t matter, because I love the imagination of an enormous simmering pot of inspiration, somewhere in the world. And when our globe is spinning and turning around, some splashes fling down on different people. Different people like an architect, an artist, an arborist or an entrepeneur who starting to play with them.
Maybe our ideas came from the same source. Or are made out of the same ingredients.

sameonechurch1

Oil on canvas, Patricia Van Lubeck, the simmering pot

How do you come up with these ideas?

8 July 2015

This question is the most asked and the most difficult to answer.
My reply is probably quite unsatisfying. Maybe people expect that I can give them one trick, a secret or a recipe. Some people may think an artist is suddenly frozen by a beam of light, called inspiration …
Well no, none of them all. My ideas are the results of my development and never thrown to me for free.
Getting a potential image in my mind is a different way of looking at the things around me. I think it is something anyone can learn.
cadmiumredmixedwithultramarineblue
When I started painting in my late twenties I noticed that my way of observing things was slowly changing. For example; I realised that while I saw a colour, I dissected the color at the same time. To be more clear; if I saw a particular kind of brown, than somewhere in my brain -almost at the same time and initially unconscious- I parted them in a certain amount blue and red … a pinch of white, and maybe some magenta.

“Ok, but colours are still not ideas, eh?”
You’re right.

Sometimes, during a milli-second, you think you see something that doesn’t match reality. Like seeing a sleeping black cat in the corner of your dusky room. But … you don’t have a cat! The second milli-second you know that it is your lost cardigan, fallen from the chair.
In the period I started painting, I hung on to that first milli-second. A sleeping cat is quite common, but sometimes a shadow may look like an airplane flying into your room. Or the garbage bags can look like a baby elephant sitting on the verge. My oldest paintings were called magic realism; Things that could be possible in reality, but are quite unlikely to happen.

Detail 1 Physalis Pecus, How do you come up with these ideasAfter that first period, I started to transform everyday materials in other materials. The folds and bumps in my duvet became a landscape of hills and the print of the fabric became a pattern of weirdly planted trees. The pins of a hairbrush became trees on a hill too. The papery husk with the tiny nerves of a gooseberry became a tree in itself. And there are my first series of landscapes, with their own fictional stories.

Times went by. In the meantime I learned some lessons in life. Experiences settled. And some stories stayed with me, meant to be told.
I still loved painting trees. But from then on the trees were no pieces of decoration any more. They got a role. They became the leading actors in what I wanted to say. And there … you get the second series of landscapes. This time with non-fictional stories. But the stories are not only my views on life … they are the views on life of millions out there. The stories are connections between your experience and mine. Different experiences of the same core.

The weird thing always has been, is that the image is there before I figure out the meaning. So, in thàt perspective you can say inspiration is coming from something I don’t have control about. But then, the stories are still coming from a source inside me.

After all, most of my ideas are more realistic than they look like at first sight. For example; On the way to Rotorua, there is a hill with trees at the left side of the road and one lonely tree at the right side. However, in reality that lonely tree is a different type, so probably driving on that road nobody sees the link like I created in a painting called ‘The brave one’. To transform the lonely tree in the same type of trees at the other side of the road, was just that image of the first milli-second.
The meaning became clear days and days later, while I was already painting the second or third layer.

  Oil on canvas, Patricia Van Lubeck

Exhibition in Auckland

6 July 2015

It’s always interesting how other people describe my work 🙂

Crystel Chen of gallery iShen said:

“Patricia’s latest series ‘Unveiled’ pinpoints familiar human characteristics and paints them as refreshingly positive statements of individualism.
Her series of landscapes are though-provoking metaphors personifying the endless roles we all inhabit throughout life. Trees are painted as symbols to represent particular characteristics.
Patricia encourages the viewer to compose their own meanings from her paintings, but believes that the universality of these subjects will prompt people to identify fragments of their own selves in her work.”

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Exhibition Auckland