Exhibition in Auckland

6 July 2015

It’s always interesting how other people describe my work 🙂

Crystel Chen of gallery iShen said:

“Patricia’s latest series ‘Unveiled’ pinpoints familiar human characteristics and paints them as refreshingly positive statements of individualism.
Her series of landscapes are though-provoking metaphors personifying the endless roles we all inhabit throughout life. Trees are painted as symbols to represent particular characteristics.
Patricia encourages the viewer to compose their own meanings from her paintings, but believes that the universality of these subjects will prompt people to identify fragments of their own selves in her work.”

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Exhibition Auckland

 

More Taipei

13 May 2015

After the art fair we had planned a 2 weeks trip through Taiwan, but before we leaving to the south by train, we stayed another few days in Taipei city.
We moved to another hotel room, experienced the public transport, bought stuff in a huge mall specialized in electronics and got trapped by interviewing students.

Reflections on Elephant Mountain

12 May 2015

Artworks that have conquered a place in the front of the market, usually are created by artists who are unmistakable distinguished persons. These artists don’t necessarily have to be extrovert characters, but in some way they are clearly presented in society. They catch the eye by their behavior, their appearance, their statements or their secondary activities.
For example, at the art fair there was an artist who was dressed like a kind of Lolita doll. That helps. The initiator of the art fair, who is an artist himself, has his own temple and a whole bunch of worshipers. That helps. There are artists who have a strong opinion. Sometimes stated through their art, but just as often simply as being an opinionated person.
I slowly got the idea that when an artist is liked as a person, people actually want to buy ‘a piece of the artist’. That makes sense if sometimes you can’t understand why specific art sells anyway. Than people don’t buy art, but buy a piece of the creator.
What I do understand (and what I always knew, but just wasn’t willing to accept) is that the artist is part of his art.

In my early painting days I didn’t want to write an explanation about my works. I was convinced that a good artwork could speak for itself. Even if the work had absolutely nothing to say. And let’s be honest; while I was younger there was less to tell. Or better said, the ‘colours’ were less varied (and I don’t mean that literally). Being aware of that fact I found my art was more decoration than a meaningful piece. And personally; pure realistic landscapes for example, are still troublesome for me in that way. What is the message?

Reflections on Elephant MountainWhile working on my last series, I spent a serious amount of time to the interpretation of my works … which was -to my surprise- much more valued by the viewers than I ever had imagined.
With adding these written meanings to my paintings I have pushed myself a step forward. It worked so well that it made me think of other aspects of my presentation. How to offer my audience an insight into who I am, without forcing myself into situations I’m not good in? Like mingling in public. Socially I never have been a ringleader. I can learn, but it never will going smooth. So I have to find another form for those who are interested in me as a person.

Maybe my vlogs could be used as a contemporary way to give something of myself?

Saving insects

12 December 2014

I just read most vloggers are between 12 and 22 years old …
Oh boy, where do I find my target group? 😀
About saving insects, playing with the cat, doing the groceries, going to the dentist and painting.

Vlogging

24 November 2014

For a while I was not sure about publishing my vlogs, because of ‘too boring’. In the first place they were intended just for family. It’s not more than a peek into my daily life in New Zealand.
My first vlogs were edited quite clumsy with too much and too long shots. In the first minutes I even made the classic mistake of keeping my smartphone upwards.
Sorry for that. It will get better.

Real life beats fantasy

27 November 2013 (South Africa)

Again I saw an appearance in nature that I painted years before I had seen it in real. Or even ever thought it would exists in real.
Our last stop back to the south of South Africa, was in the little town Graaff Reinet. A few miles out of town there was a large National Park called Camdeboo. On one of the viewpoints there was a beautiful view on the mountain ‘Spandau Kop’. Look how it has -in a certain way- similarities with a painting I created in 2003, when I never have had one single thought about visiting South-Africa in the future.
It’s a kind of inspiration the other way around.

Spandau Kop, Valley of desolation, Graaff Reinet, South Africa, Patricia Van Lubeck Patricia Van Lubeck, Real life beats fantasy 1

The locked up guys, viewing us from their safe cabin, are making the ‘backwards inspiration’ even crazier, viewed in the light of my recent thoughts about the gap between black and white people in South-Africa.




The dogs of Bloemfontein

25 November 2013 (South Africa)
eastern-cape, the dogs of bloemfontein
The next morning sun, sun and sun all over! Yes, of course; a clear blue sky on the day we had planned to be locked up in the car again, driving back to the south.
It would be nice to find an ATM for some fresh cash and a good cup of coffee. Therefore we headed to the fairly large town called Rustenburg. But once arrived, it’s such a confusing mess again. Guddamn, why so much garbage on the streets?

Never mind; we still had some cookies in our food box. And a bottle of water.
The rest of the day we are driving through a boring, dry, but sunny landscape. And we got seriously cursed by a local guy, because we braked for a crossing cow … Huh? Isn’t that right to do? I’m afraid if we had hit the cow, we were killed by the family, because not seldom some head of cattle are their only possession.

If we stepped out of the car after arriving in Bloemfontein (at first glance, a breath of fresh air in terms of civilization) I felt the first raindrops on my head. At the horizon huge black cauliflowers with lightning, were quickly rolling in … We even didn’t roll our eyes anymore.
By phone we ordered a room in a luxurious neighborhood, hoping the accommodation was a bit luxurious too. We asked in advance if it was possible to cook in the room. Yes, it was.
The room appeared to be 3 x 4 meters, stuffed with 2 single beds, a wardrobe and a ‘kitchen unit’. There was no room left for a suitcase. Cooking facilities meant a mini microwave and a kettle. That’s it. When we asked if that was all there was … somebody was sent out to grab a dusty hot plate and 2 pans from the attic of the main house …
Cooking is very challenging without cutlery and no hot water, but we didn’t dare continuing to whine.

Before cooking we wanted to stretch our legs and went for a walk in these luxury streets. The upscale neighborhoods are not built for pedestrians. It is intended that the citizens in this part of town are driving from their garage behind the electric gates right to another high guarded area. Probably their feet hardly touch public grounds. So, there are no sidewalks. Our walk resulted in passing 70 barbed wired electric fences and at least we turned on 35 watchdogs who started furiously barking to us. Nobody here is walking just for fun. Walking means poverty and walking through rich neighbourhoods is considered as ‘bad intentions’. That’s of course not exactly the conclusion of the barking dogs, but they are conditioned to their bosses ideas, isn’t it?
As a foreigner I don’t want to have an opinion about this, but  in a strange way these neighbourhoods gave me the feeling of an upside down open air jail. But it’s inspiring anyway …